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High Shbg And Weakness

Discussion in 'Male Health & HRT' started by tom, Feb 1, 2019.

  1. tom

    tom Member

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    Just seen the news about Dr John. RIP.

    Thought i would post up my new info and bloods. Having a few difficulties at the moment.

    I have just had some blood tests done in January.

    I am experiencing some strange physical symptoms which are quite new. I have been having pains in my arms last year and went to the doctor thinking it maybe arthritis. I had some blood tests done and the inflammation marker was low, so no issue with arthritis i was told.

    Anyway my pains have gotten stronger and i am significantly weaker in my forearm and hand area. My knees are also feeling pretty weak.

    I am fit and healthy generally, but these pains have really started to get to me now. Hence i had some blood tests done privately.

    They show i am low in androgens (at the bottom of the androgen scale), even though testosterone is ok, but it is the high SHBG which is the killer. These are the results:

    FOLLICLE STIM. HORMONE 11.8 IU/L 1.50 - 12.40

    LUTEINISING HORMONE 7.01 IU/L 1.70 - 8.60

    TESTOSTERONE 18.4 nmol/L 8.64 - 29.00

    FREE-TESTOSTERONE(CALCULATED) 0.278 nmol/L 0.20 - 0.62

    SEX HORMONE BINDING GLOB 54.3 nmol/L 18.30 - 54.10

    FREE ANDROGEN INDEX 33.89 Ratio 24.00 - 104.00

    17-BETA OESTRADIOL 93.4 pmol/L 41.00 - 159.00

    PROLACTIN 263 mIU/L 86.00 - 324.00

    I take T4 for hypothyroidism and it is common for thyroid patients to get achy joints, but i never have (until this last year). But my thyroid results are fine. I would say my FT4 would be a little better lower, but generally all good and pretty typical.

    THYROID STIMULATING HORMONE 1.39 mIU/L 0.27 - 4.20

    FREE THYROXINE 21.700 pmol/L 12.00 - 22.00

    FREE T3 4.9 pmol/L 3.10 - 6.80

    I am not sure where to go for some help because in the UK we don't really have a system which looks at male hormone health, unless everything is really low. I doubt i will get much help with these results.

    What do people think could be the problem ?

    I eat a pretty clean diet, don't drink much alcohol and don't smoke. I am always steady with my weight at 80kg and don't carry much fat on the stomach. I don't work out in a gym, but i play football and am pretty active and have a manual job doing construction. I am mid 40's.

    Final bit of info which may be relevant; i am sure i have only one working testicle as had one undescended at birth and so had an operation pre puberty. I know i have damaged sperm production as we have undergone fertility help 5 years ago. Hence my always high FSH level (please make more sperm mr testicle).

    Thanks for reading any comments appreciated.
     
  2. Youthful55Guy

    Youthful55Guy Member

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    A couple of thoughts.

    Your TT looks OK, so it's not a T production issue, but you already knew that.

    Yes, your SHBG is high and that is driving down your Free T and that really sucks because it's difficult to treat. I too have a similar problem, but with even higher SHBG than you do.

    About 7% of men are genetically programmed for higher SHBG because we add an extra sugar molecule to the protein and that more than doubles the half-life. Since we secrete the protein at the same rate as the rest of the population, it leads to much higher levels in the blood. That, in turn, sucks up T and prevents it from crossing the blood-brain barrier where we need it to feel normal.

    FYI, it is well documented that supplemental thyroid hormones will increase SHBG, so you might want to consider backing off on your dose. I did (Armour Thyroid in my case from 90 to 60 mg/day) and that brought it down from the 90's to the 50's, but still high).

    I've researched this topic ad nauseum, and you basically have 2 treatment options.
    1) Increase your T dose to saturate the protein until enough T spills over to feel normal. The upside is that it does work, but the downside is that it increases side-effects from high TT levels. Also note, that since one of the functions of SHBG is to protect T from liver metabolism, your TT will go very high using this method.

    2) Use certain anabolic drugs that have been proven to lower SHBG. I can tell you from experience that stanozolol (Winstrol) is extremely effective at very low doses (5 mg/day or less) and so is oxandrolone (Anavar) but it requires about twice as much (around 10 mg per day. The upside is that the drugs are very effective at low doses and stanozolol is dirt cheep (Anavar, not). The downside is that there are liver toxicity concerns with long-term use and it is EXTREMELY difficult to get a doc to prescribe anabolic hormones to lower SHBG. Many dinosaur docs even refuse to acknowledge the importance of monitoring SHBG in a TRT program.

    As for me, I chose initially for option #1 because that was the only option available to me from my doc. However, side-effects (mostly high hemoglobin) forced me to go off the reservation and self medicate with option #2, but we can't discuss the details of that here due to forum rules.

    More recently, I am experimenting with going back to option #1 but with adding in low dose finasteride to control DHT. My doc is willing to go there. There is some good recent research showing that it's DHT rather than T that drives excessive RBC production while on TRT. I also added in low dose anastrozole to keep E2 in range. The jury is still out on whether this approach will work for me. I've only recently started this approach and will have new labs in a couple weeks and I'll probably be adjusting dosages for many months to come. Keep in mind too that while on finasteride, and for 4 weeks after discontinuation, you cannot donate blood because the drug is HIGHLY teratogenic to developing male fetuses.
     
  3. tom

    tom Member

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    Thanks YG for the information. Very interesting and the first decent info i have gotten with regards to my situation.

    The Thyroid use may well be part of it.

    I read nettle tea may be a useful tool to help lower the SHBG, so i have got some and started it last night. I will be having a cup each evening for the next few weeks to see if anything happens.

    I might try drop the T4 and add some T3 to see if this produces a better balance.

    I will try update here any feedback i get. I do expect to feel better as the spring and summer kicks in. I always seem to have issues in the winter months.
     
  4. Youthful55Guy

    Youthful55Guy Member

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    Good luck, but the only thing the SHBG supplements (mostly nettle, boron, and D3) was the size of my pocketbook. Although, I am a supporter of supplementing with D3. When you are genetically programmed for high SHBG, you have to treat it like a medical disorder and that generally requires a pharmaceutical approach.
     
  5. Captain

    Captain Member

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    I think I remember Dr. Crisler say that growth hormone has effects on SHBG. Estrogen and dieting increases SHBG. Insulin lowers SHBG so adding more carbs could help. I know from labs my SHBG moves 10 points from strict low carb and normal carb intake. I would think increasing Cortisol levels would effect SHBG by making you insulin resistant.
     
  6. SHBGMD

    SHBGMD New Member

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    Youthful55Guy,

    I stumbled across this forum by mistake, but am I glad I did!
    I am a physician, and we treat our patients with hormones as part of a more comprehensive approach to spine and musculoskeletal injury. We use regenerative and functional medicine to restore function and control pain.
    I, too, have a sky-high SHBG, and high total testosterone, with low-ish free testosterone.
    More recently, I have experienced ED, out of the blue (rapid onset, over maybe 2-3 months). So naturally, whereas before I looked at my labs just academically, now the problem has hit home (!).
    I have asked many of my colleagues, TRT experts, urologists, BioTe experts (makers of the testosterone and estrogen pellets we use in our clinic) and nobody gave me an answer even half as good as what you wrote above.
    In my own interest, but also in the interest of science and helping other people with this problem, I would really appreciate connecting with you and discussing your experience further.
    I'm not sure what the forum rules are. I certainly don't want to break any of them, but please let me know if you would be available to have a private email exchange or a phone conversation. I can send you email/phone numbers or whatever.
    Thanks again for the information. I would also be interested in your sources. I read many articles, but could never actually find that sort of information anywhere, which led me to this website, and others. But nobody ever gave me a good explanation. Until now.
     
  7. Youthful55Guy

    Youthful55Guy Member

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    You can contact my through PM in the forum. Given that I had to commit a felony to obtain the medications I need for my medical condition, I prefer not to do phone chats or any other media that my expose my identity.

    Pretty much everything I've learned is readily available over the internet. You just have to dig for it. In my case, this is tempered with lots of my own labs that I pay for myself through DiscountedLabs.com (see link below as a forum sponsor). I'll post links to published studies that I've found helpful in understanding my condition.

    PS: I'm not a medical doctor, but I do have extensive medical research experience. This helps me with understanding the terminology but not necessarily the clinical application of the knowledge. Most of that is simply through reading publications and understanding my labs that doctors have ordered and that I've payed for myself.
     
  8. Youthful55Guy

    Youthful55Guy Member

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    Regarding the Thyroid connection, here are 2 publications that show a connection along with some notes that I made regarding the studies. Full text versions are available through OPEN ACCESS on PUBMED:

    Note in the following study that they used an old RIA method for Testosterone measurements. This means they are measuring Total (not Free) T. My guess is that T production is not affected by Thyroid hormones, but rather the increase in Total T is an anomaly of higher SHBG. SHBG protects T from liver metabolism, but since it is bound it is not active (particularly in the CNS).

    The study is important in that it does demonstrate that both T4 and T3 affect SHBG production.
    J Androl. 1988 May-Jun;9(3):215-9.

    Serum levels of total testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin in hypothyroid patients and normal subjects treated with incremental doses of L-T4 or L-T3.
    Cavaliere H1, Abelin N, Medeiros-Neto G.
    Abstract
    Plasma testosterone (T) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were assayed in normal controls (N = 9) and hypothyroid patients (N = 17) receiving increasing doses of L-T4 (0.2 mg, 0.4 mg for 30 days), followed first by 30 days without medication and then by 30 days each of 0.05 mg L-T3 and 0.2 mg L-T3. Normal male controls showed a significant increase in plasma T only at high doses of either L-T4 (0.4 mg) or L-T3 (0.2 mg). A small but significant increase in plasma T levels was observed in normal female subjects at 0.4 mg of T4. In both men and women, plasma SHBG increased in a dose-dependent manner with L-T4 or L-T3 and correlated positively and significantly with serum thyroid hormone levels. Hypothyroid male subjects had significantly lower levels of plasma T (mean +/- SD) of 279 +/- 131 ng/dl as compared with normal males (431 +/- 118 ng/dl), which reached the normal range only at a relatively high dose of either L-T4 (0.4 mg) or L-T3 (0.2 mg). No significant changes in plasma T were seen in the hypothyroid female group. Basal plasma SHBG levels were significantly lower in both hypothyroid men and women and increased towards normal levels during L-T4 and L-T3 therapy, although the response to thyroid hormones was significantly lower than that of normal controls. These results indicate that thyroid hormone therapy increases plasma SHBG levels in both normal and hypothyroid patients and that this increase precedes the expected elevation of plasma T in males.
    PMID: 3403362
    From <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=3403362>


    Granted the following is a mouse study, but it does provide a mechanism for the observed increase in SHBG in response to thyroid hormones.
    J Mol Endocrinol. 2009 Jul;43(1):19-27. doi: 10.1677/JME-09-0025. Epub 2009 Mar 31.

    Thyroid hormones act indirectly to increase sex hormone-binding globulin production by liver viahepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha.
    Selva DM1, Hammond GL.
    Abstract
    Thyroid hormones increase hepatic sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) production, which is also regulated by hepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha (HNF-4alpha) in response to changes in the metabolic state of the liver. Since the human SHBG promoter lacks a typical thyroidhormone response element, and because thyroid hormones influence metabolic state, we set out to determine whether thyroid hormonesmediate SHBG expression indirectly via changes in HNF-4alpha levels in HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cells, and in the livers of transgenic mice that express a 4.3 kb human SHBG transgene under the control of its own 0.8 kb promoter sequence. Thyroid hormones(triiodothyronine (T(3)) and thyroxine (T(4))) increase SHBG accumulation in HepG2 cell culture medium over 5 days, and increase cellular SHBG mRNA levels. In addition, T(4) treatment of HepG2 cells for 5 days increased HNF-4alpha mRNA and HNF-4alpha levels in concert with decreased cellular palmitate levels. Plasma SHBG levels were also increased in mice expressing a human SHBG transgene after 5 days treatment with T(3) along with increased hepatic HNF-4alpha levels. In HepG2 cells, the human SHBG promoter failed to respond acutely (within 24 h) to T(4) treatment, but a 4-day pre-treatment with T(4) resulted in a robust response that was prevented by co-treatment with HNF-4alpha siRNA, or by blocking the beta-oxidation of palmitate through co-treatment with the carnitine palmitoyltransferase I inhibitor, etomoxir. These data lead us to conclude that thyroid hormones increase SHBG production indirectly by increasing HNF-4alpha gene expression, and by reducing cellular palmitate levels that further contribute to increased HNF-4alpha levels in hepatocytes.
    PMID: 19336534
    From <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19336534>
     
  9. Youthful55Guy

    Youthful55Guy Member

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    Regarding the effectiveness of Anavar (Oxandrolone). Here are my notes from a very well designed study with HIV patients that demonstrate its effectiveness. The study is available OPEN ACCESS on PubMed. You have to dread and understand the full text to get all the information I've extracted and summarized. The abstract only provides a small amount of the information. I've not come a cross a similar study (yet) on Winstrol, but that's probably because it was withdrawn from the US market due to marketing reasons (not safety), so there's not a much interest in researching it. It is available in the EU and other parts of the world. My personal experience is that it is as effective as oxandrolone, but at 1/2 the dose and 1/8 the price.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16540931
    • Increasing doses from 20 to 80 mg daily had increasing suppressive effect on SHBG (% Decrease)
      • Placebo: +1.0% (NS)
      • 20mg: -58.9% (p=0.0001)
      • 40mg: -63.4% (p=0.0001)
      • 80mg: -79.2% (p=0.001)
    • Increasing doses from 20 to 80mg had increasing suppressive effect on HPTA (LH data given as example, but also shown with FSH and Total Testosterone)
      • LH Placebo: +26.4% (NS)
      • 20mg: -26.5% (p=0.0029)
      • 40mg: -34.0% (p=0.0020)
      • 80mg: -54.1% (p=0.001)
    • Interestingly, increasing doses from 20 to 80mg had no effect on Hemoglobin production.
    • Increasing doses from 20 to 80 mg had increasingly detrimental effects on liver enzymes and cholesterol. At 20 mg, the changes seemed to be more manageable.
    • Take home message. Keep doses under 40mg. Do not use for extended periods without a break (advice in forums seems to be around 8 week cycles).
    My AVG SHBG since 2012 without Wistrol or Anavar (n=11 lab tests) at progressively higher doses of Armour Thyroid (from 30 mg in early tests to 90 mg in later tests) = 66.1 nmol/L (normal range = 17.3-65.8 nmol/L)

    My AVG SHBG since 2015 without Wistrol or Anavar (3 tests) at 90 mg Armour Thyroid = 76.0 nmol/L - Note, more recent test at 90 mg Armour and no Wistrol or Anavar was over 90 nmol/L.

    When I used 30 mg/day Anavar while at 90 mg Armour, my SHBG was 20.2 nmol/L

    Since then, I've had 10 labs with doses of Armour from 90 to 45 mg/day and doses of Winstrol (stanozolol) from 5 to 12 mg per day (working on finding the right combination). My SHBG has ranged from a low of 16.5 to a high of 37.3 nmol/L. My conclusion from these dose-finding experiments is that the optimum dose of Armour to keep my thyroid hormones in the "normal" range is 60 mg. At 60 mg Armour, my optimum dose of stanozolol appears to be about 2.5 mg 2X per day (5 mg/day). This will keep my SHBG is the mid 20's to lower 30's.

    But note that when the T dose is held constant, that TT will drop with the use of stanozolol or Oxandrolone because less of the T is bound and more exposed to liver metabolism. Conversely, Free T increases at the same time TT decreases.
     
  10. SHBGMD

    SHBGMD New Member

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    This is great information. Thank you! I will read the studies and digest everything. Just so you know, my SHBG is 164 nmol/L (last normal lab range is 13-90 nmol/L). So don't feel bad...
    BTW, I looked and cannot figure out how to do private messaging through the forum.
     
  11. Youthful55Guy

    Youthful55Guy Member

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    Click on the member's name and it will bring up a pop up menu. Among the choices is "Start a New Conversation", which is the PM feature of the message board.

    I don't participate in this forum as much as I used to because of the forum limitations of discussing my non-prescribed treatments. I respect the forum owners right not to allow those types of discussions (probably for liability issues), so I try to respect them. I participate much more frequently in a another forum sponsored by folks who market those types of non-prescribed meds, so their forum rules allow me to be more open in my discussions SHBG treatment. I post under the same screen name. You can probably find the forum with search of the words "Hormone Replacement Therapy - Low Testosterone Treatment, Anti-Aging". The downside to that forum is that there's lots of chat on the more cosmetic uses of testosterone and related drugs.
     
  12. tom

    tom Member

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    Thanks again YG.

    I have checked some old blood tests from 2009/10 and i was on much higher thyroid meds at the time.

    Testosterone was 15 and 17 (10-31 nmol)

    SHBG was 30.5 and 40 (13-71 nmol)

    So the range for SHBG has dropped down a bit.

    Age at the time was 38 approx.

    So i am pleased to see my testosterone level is staying up, just the SHBG is going higher.

    I think because my thyroid meds are much more stable and consistent currently this helps keep testosterone higher.

    I think something to do with my problems is the ability of the body to use and process the T4. It seems to hang around in the blood more than other people. So this probably has a knock on effect of the body binding up the testosterone for some reason.

    I say this because on 112.5 T4 my FT4 is top of the range and i would expect it to be lower (based on previous bloods over the years).

    I use a little progesterone oil still (3mg every other day) and i am wondering if my knocking back on the progesterone has stopped the T4 from being sucked up fast enough. I noticed when i first used the progesterone it had a really beneficial effect on my thyroid system and i have bloods from the time of first using it showing TSH went up and the FT4 went down. I have used it for 2 1/2 years now , but last summer i started to miss day using it at 6mg per day and over this winter i have pretty much dropped to zero usage (until this week when i have decided to give it a go again).
     
  13. Youthful55Guy

    Youthful55Guy Member

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    Just a couple of thoughts.

    1) Testosterone levels should always be balanced using Free T as your guide. When you have high SHBG, Total T is worse than being worthless. High SHBG drives up Total T because it protects the T that is present from liver metabolism, but it binds it tightly which prevents it from passing through the blood-brain barrier to the CNS where it is needed to feel "normal". So, with high SHBG, you can be swimming a sea of peripheral T, but still feel like crap because little of it is getting to the brain where it is needed.

    2) Be extremely carful when using progesterone (P4) in a TRT protocol. High Total T tends to also drive up conversion to E, so with high SHBG you can be high on TT, high on E (due to conversion), but low on Free T. being moderately high in E is not necessarily a bad thing, but Hi E in the presence of High P4 can cause rapid development of the mammary gland. This is precisely what happened during the third trimester of pregnancy in women when they experience rapid mammary development. Needless to say, this is not a good thing for men. If you add in high prolactin to the mix, you can actually begin to lactate. I've seen videos of it on the internet. It's not a pretty sight.
     
  14. tom

    tom Member

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    The only problem i have is access to testosterone in the UK. No docs will help me with my numbers over here, so i really am left to try and work through some solutions on my own.

    My progesterone usage initially boosted T by 23%. I had blood testing done before and then after first using it 3 years ago. I went from 17 to 21 nmol. This was 100% due to the progesterone.

    However, over time i don't think the conversion pathway stays open to testosterone.

    I only use small doses of progesterone and i have never seen any sign of breast tissue development. When i stopped using it i did however notice an improvement in strength and tightness of muscle. So i am now back to tentatively using it again, but really at a dose of 1.5mg per day (1 drop of oil every other day).

    Can i ask how you have been on the testosterone replacement over time ? Has it given you your health back ? Is it the answer to an ageing body or is this over blown a little ?
     
  15. Youthful55Guy

    Youthful55Guy Member

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    Can i ask how you have been on the testosterone replacement over time ? Has it given you your health back ? Is it the answer to an ageing body or is this over blown a little ?

    I've been using TRT since January 2012, so a little over 7 years.

    Yes, it has made a big difference in my health. My issues were mostly CNS in origin, lost interest, inability to focus at work, low energy, the need for frequent naps, low libido, ED, difficulty in achieving orgasm, and for lack of a better description a "buzzing feeling in my head. There have also been physical benefits such as improved muscle quality and ability to recover from exercise, but these were mild and secondary benefits.

    No, I don't believe the anti-aging benefits are over blown. They were real for me.
     
  16. tom

    tom Member

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    Well sounds good, but health care in the UK is terrible. Hormone replacement is only for wealthy individuals.

    There is a doc doing consults near me (not london) so i may give it a go eventually. £200 for a consult.

    I will try messing with my thyroid meds first to see if i can made a difference.
     
  17. SHBGMD

    SHBGMD New Member

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    Hey Tom, with all due respect, two hundred pounds for an initial consult is very cheap. Most Functional Medicine doctors in the US charge at least that monthly for a subscription. Most initial consults with good hormone experts range from $1000-5000 (!).
    Of course, it's all a matter of perspective. If you get value for your money, then it's worth it.
     
  18. tom

    tom Member

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    But do you have insurance to cover this cost in america ? We don't.

    We have a national tax system which provides very limited services and if you want extras you have to pay for them.

    Hormone treatment is generally carried out in London, but there are docs now doing it in the regions i think.

    I just worry about getting sucked in to testosterone replacement and then working out how to get balanced. Eventually you get there but at a cost.

    At $1000-5000 no wonder people go it alone on the net.
     
  19. SHBGMD

    SHBGMD New Member

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    The type of doctors with the knowledge to help with complicated HRT problems are not covered by insurance. The costs I mentioned are out of pocket.
    American insurance covers less and less, with more and more our of pocket cost.
    The type of care and knowledge you are seeking are definitely "extras you have to pay for"(!)
     
  20. Youthful55Guy

    Youthful55Guy Member

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    Cost and insurance coverage of TRT is highly fragmented in the USA. However, Testosterone (cypionate) is dirt cheep. I don't even bother submitting it to my insurance carrier. I use Pizer branded Depo-Testosterone 200mg/mL. At my Local Pharmacy it costs $63.36 per 10 mL. At prescribed dose of 0.2 mL E3D = 50 doses/vial = 150 days of treatment = $0.4224/day = $154.18/year. Truth be told, I actually dose at 0.22 mL E3D, but my doc doesn't know about that.

    The difficulty is finding a primary physician that takes your insurance and is willing to write your prescription. Fortunately, over time I've cultivated a good relationship with my primary physician and she is will to write the scripts. Otherwise, as SHBFMD pointed out, you need to go to an "Anti-Aging" clinic and they generally do not take any insurance coverage for the visits.

    Here's a breakdown of the cost of my entire hormone program:

    TOTAL COST OF ALL PRIMARY HORMONES (all prescribed) = $1,041.76/year
    Testosterone Cypionate -Pizer branded Depo-Testosterone 200mg/mL - Local Pharmacy $63.36/10 mL. At prescribed dose of 0.2 mL E3D = 50 doses/vial = 150 days of treatment = $0.4224/day = $154.18/year

    HCG - Merck branded Pregny - Local Pharmacy $127.01/10,000 IU = $0.012514/IU. At 1050 IU/week (current dose 2X more than prescribed) = $13.34/week = $693.47/year. Most guys can get by on half (or less than this).

    Armour Thyroid - Cost after insurance = $0.1852/30 mg tablet. @ 60mg/day = $0.37/day = $135.19/year

    Syringes (for testosterone) - 122 (28G 1/2 inch) 1 cc insulin syringes/year. Currently use Easy Touch brand from https://www.totaldiabetessupply.com/products/easytouch-28g-1cc-1-2-inch. $14.45/100 = $0.14 each = 122 X $0.14 = $17.08 /year

    Syringes (for HCG) - 156 (31G 5/16 inch) 0.5 cc insulin syringes/year. Currently use Easy Touch brand from https://www.totaldiabetessupply.com/products/easytouch-insulin-syringe-31g-5cc-5-16-inch. $13.99/100 = $0.14 each 156 X $0.14 = $21.84 /year

    Doctor Visit (copay) = 1/year at $20 = $20.00 /year
    Labs = $0 (no copy)

    Additional Labs: I usually order at least 2 sets of labs per year above the very complete set my doctor orders at my annual visit. These labs usually cost ~$350 for a full set of T panel (including SHBG), DHT, Thyroid panel, and E. Total supplemental cost ~700/year. However, per note 2 below, I probably will not continue with the added thyroid paned (~166/year), so the adjusted supplemental lab cost is about $534/year
    Note 1: I don't order additional Hemoglobin labs because this is tested free every 1-10 weeks when I donate blood.
    Note 2: Thyroid labs are optional for me, but this past year I've been experimenting with optimizing Armour Thyroid (prescribed) and Stanozolol doses for controlling my high SHBG (Armour pushes it up & Stanozolol brings it down).
     

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