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Immediate boost in libido, thermogenesis and digestion from eating skyr

Discussion in 'Male Health & HRT' started by Sargovar, Jan 25, 2014.

  1. Sargovar

    Sargovar New Member

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    I ate skyr for the first time ever yesterday. It's an icelandic cultured dairy product, similar to strained yoghurt, that contains high amounts of various strains of beneficial bacteria. It has zero fat, very low carbs and high protein content. You can find a more detailed description here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skyr

    Anyways, I wasn't expecting anything to happen, I was just eating a vanilla flavored sugar-free container of skyr as a treat and to get some extra protein since I had a heavy workout that day. But within 15-20 minutes of consuming it, I got a sudden spike in libido that took me totally by surprise.. I started feeling a sexual hunger that came out of nowhere. I also felt my digestion cranking into motion and indeed had a bowel movement shortly afterwards (like my body was detoxing or something), and felt my entire body warming up. I've been feeling this uncomfortable sensation of constant low-grade nausea combined with shivering and having a hard time staying warm for a long time now. Granted, we've had a cold spell with temperatures down to -21C / -6f or even lower at night, but it feels more like some sort of internal thing than just a reaction to the outside temperature. My thyroid labs look good on paper and my body temps are normally ~37C even when this 'shivering' happens. But when I ate the skyr, the shivering stopped and my entire body warmed up. I still feel kind of funky in my stomach, but right now it feels more like there's a war going on down there, and the good guys are finally packing some heat!

    I thought this might've been just a fluke, but I repeated the skyr test today and sure enough, the exact same thing happened: libido shot up, I had a bowel movement and felt my entire body warming up. I can only guess that my gut is out of whack and the probiotics contained in the skyr helped nudge things in the right direction. It's odd, though, because I haven't really benefited from most probiotic strains that I've tried so far, with maybe one exception, and the manufacturer discontinued that product some years back. Funny how big an impact the health of your gut can have on every aspect of your well-being, even your libido!
     
    BadassBlues likes this.
  2. JanSz

    JanSz Well-Known Member

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    Nuts---walnuts, almond, pistachio, pine nuts
    they contain natural resistant starch
    they make hydroxy-butyrate
    no cooking of nuts
    increase bifido bacteria
    also
    include fermented meats, salami, prosciutto, ham


    ...
     
  3. pmgamer18

    pmgamer18 Prince of the Forums

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    My gut was messed up for taking antiboics for so long and taking probiotics my RT3 levels came down so if your gut is a mess this mess's with your whole body.
     
  4. BadassBlues

    BadassBlues Super Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I just gave this thread 5 stars and you some rep points, I believe you may have just hit upon something that could answer a lot of questions regarding libido, mood and overall mental health from an oft overlooked and highly important aspect of our health and well being.

    No, it's not skyr, but it is gut health. There is, and has been a lot of talk on this subject, but rarely does that talk include the enormous affect our gut has on our neurotransmitters. This is just a quick read:

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/gut-second-brain/

    Technically known as the enteric nervous system, the second brain consists of sheaths of neurons embedded in the walls of the long tube of our gut, or alimentary canal, which measures about nine meters end to end from the esophagus to the anus. The second brain contains some 100 million neurons, more than in either the spinal cord or the peripheral nervous system, Gershon says.

    This multitude of neurons in the enteric nervous system enables us to "feel" the inner world of our gut and its contents. Much of this neural firepower comes to bear in the elaborate daily grind of digestion. Breaking down food, absorbing nutrients, and expelling of waste requires chemical processing, mechanical mixing and rhythmic muscle contractions that move everything on down the line.


    So the question is this regarding libido specifically, If we are hormonally balanced, in good shape and all other indications of health seem to be good but the libido and mood are off, can this be tied to the state of our "second brain"? Gut health is obviously key to our physical well being, but is it also the key to our mental well being? Considering the role of the gut in neurotransmitter function, I would have to say yes.
     
  5. Sargovar

    Sargovar New Member

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    Cheers Jansz! I eat nuts from time to time, though not that much lately. Will have to incorporate them back into my diet as a staple. The fermented meats sound good, too.

    Phil, that's interesting. I absolutely agree: what goes on in the gut can have a profound impact on your health, for better or for worse. I had my RT3 checked for the first time through a Belgian lab and it was right smack in the middle of the range, so it seems I'm ok in that area. I wonder what messed up my gut in the first place, though? I haven't touched antibiotics of any kind for the past 10 years at least. If my memory serves me right the last time I took a course was in my teens, I think it was for a sinus infection. The gut problems started cropping up when I was around 24, and by the time I was 26 they were really noticeable, even though I drink practically zero alcohol and have a healthy diet. I guess it's just poor genetics or some really clandestine, hard to trace problem like messed up methylation, a hidden infection or something else I haven't yet tested and ruled out.

    Another thing I'm noticing now is my appetite increased tremendously since I started eating the skyr. It's a healthy feeling of hunger, not the 'sick in the gut, shaky, low blood sugar, bad taste in the mouth' kinda "hunger" I sometimes get.

    Whoever gave me rep points for this thread, I heartily salute you good sir! :cheers2:
     
  6. BadassBlues

    BadassBlues Super Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Common bacteria found in skyr:

    Streptococcus thermophilus

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    (Redirected from Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus)

    Jump to: navigation, search




    Streptococcus thermophilus



    Scientific classification

    Kingdom: Bacteria
    Phylum: Firmicutes
    Class: Bacilli
    Order: Lactobacillales
    Family: Streptococcaceae
    Genus: Streptococcus
    Species: S. thermophilus

    Binomial name

    Streptococcus thermophilus
    (ex Orla-Jensen 1919)
    Schleifer et al. 1995

    Synonyms


    Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus (Orla-Jensen, 1919) Farrow et Collins 1984


    Streptococcus thermophilus Streptococcus thermophilus (previous name Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus)[1] · [2] is a Gram-positive bacteria and a homofermentative facultative anaerobe, of the viridans group.[3] It tests negative for cytochrome, oxidase and catalase, and positive for alpha-hemolytic activity.[3] It is non-motile and does not form endospores.[3]

    It is also classified as a lactic acid bacterium.[4] S. thermophilus is found in fermented milk products. and is generally used in the production of yogurt,[5] alongside Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. The two species are synergistic, and S. thermophilus probably provides L.d. bulgaricus with folic acid and formic acid which it uses for purine synthesis.[6]


    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to: navigation, search




    Lactobacillus bulgaricus



    Scientific classification

    Kingdom: Bacteria
    Division: Firmicutes
    Class: Bacilli
    Order: Lactobacillales
    Family: Lactobacillaceae
    Genus: Lactobacillus
    Species: L. delbrueckii
    Subspecies: L. d. bulgaricus

    Trinomial name

    Lactobacillus bulgaricus
    (Orla-Jensen 1919)
    Rogosa & Hansen 1971
    Weiss et al. 1984 (subspecies status)

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (until 1984 known as Lactobacillus bulgaricus) is one of several bacteria used for the production of yogurt. It is also found in other naturally fermented products. First identified in 1905 by the Bulgarian doctor Stamen Grigorov, the bacterium feeds on lactose to produce lactic acid, which is used to preserve milk.

    It is a Gram-positive rod that may appear long and filamentous. It is non-motile and does not form spores. It is regarded as aciduric or acidophilic, since it requires a low pH (around 5.4–4.6) to grow effectively. The bacterium has complex nutritional requirements.
     
  7. Sargovar

    Sargovar New Member

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    Ah, my mystery benefactor has revealed himself. Thanks a lot Badass, much obliged! I agree 100%: the gut is like the foundation of the body. What transpires there has a huge impact on neurotransmitter production, body detoxification, nutrient absorption.. the list is endless. We really can't afford to neglect it. That article explains it brilliantly, and I've heard that statement being made numerous time by holistic health practitioners: the brain and gut are very much intertwined. The gut also has a huge influence on the blood-brain-barrier, and having a leaky gut can also compromise the BBB.

    I was totally surprised by the effect the skyr had no me. I realize it's not some magical property that's unique to skyr alone, but in my case it seems to contain just the right combination of probiotics. I'll have to incorporate it into my daily diet. It tastes good too, so that's a bonus!

     
  8. BadassBlues

    BadassBlues Super Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-neuroscience-of-gut/

    Moreover, these bacteria have been implicated in the development of neurological and behavioral disorders. For example, gut bacteria may have an influence on the body’s use of vitamin B6, which in turn has profound effects on the health of nerve and muscle cells. They modulate immune tolerance and, because of this, they may have an influence on autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. They have been shown to influence anxiety-related behavior, although there is controversy regarding whether gut bacteria exacerbate or ameliorate stress related anxiety responses. In autism and other pervasive developmental disorders, there are reports that the specific bacterial species present in the gut are altered and that gastrointestinal problems exacerbate behavioral symptoms. A newly developed biochemical test for autism is based, in part, upon the end products of bacterial metabolism.
     
  9. hebsie

    hebsie Super Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    ...there's actually little to zilch RS in those food choices, with the exception of cashews, but then they're not really nuts anyways. Perhaps they're (^) all just JK's twist on this new & hot paleo trend ?? --> Resistant Starch

    To benefit, you need to get back to reality, eat starchy foods like potatoes, plantains, green bananas, oats, beans, etc...
     
  10. Sargovar

    Sargovar New Member

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    This is very interesting.. I wonder how big a part my gut problems play in my vitiligo? It is thought to be autoimmune driven, after all. My brother developed vitiligo too, but at a later age. Mine started gradually when I was 22, his when he was 30-31, just a couple of years ago. His vitiligo has been much more aggressive and fast-spreading, though.
    I don't want to count my chickens till they hatch, but I feel a damn sight better after just 2 days of eating skyr, one measly container per day! Come to think of it, I feel much less anxious now, too. I always knew my gut was in distress, but couldn't fix it even though I tried various probiotics, glutamine, changes to my diet etc. They provided slight relief at best, or none at all, but this skyr stuff feels at least as potent (if not more so) as the one probiotic supplement which ever really worked for me. This is just a layman's guess, but maybe the delivery works better when the bacteria occurs naturally in food, as opposed to taking it in pill form?
     
  11. BadassBlues

    BadassBlues Super Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    A layman's guess based on actual experience is better than a pseudo scientist's theory based on science fiction. You know your body, how it feels and what is happening at the time. Your a guy who takes the time to research the facts. Thanks for sharing this...:thumbup1:
     
  12. Sargovar

    Sargovar New Member

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    I hear ya Badass! I feel like this is probably the biggest, most unexpected and fastest improvement in my health that I've had in a long while. I hope this can be sustained! And I thank you very much for contributing to this thread and posting a solid article! You gave me a lot of food for thought :coolgleamA:
     
  13. JanSz

    JanSz Well-Known Member

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    vitiligo, an incurable pigmentation disorder and autoimmune disease

    You should stay away or limit nightshdes consumption.
    Most common nightshades are potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, sweet and hot peppers, but there is many more.


    ..................
     
  14. BadassBlues

    BadassBlues Super Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    That is contrary advice to a condition that has a wide internet support system in place.

    http://www.vitiligosociety.org.uk/index.php/nutrition.html

    Summary
    It is clear that there is no simple nutritional answer to vitiligo. However, as a good supply of nutrients is required both to promote a healthy skin and in the pigmentation process, a good, varied diet is important.

    The best way to ensure adequate amounts of these nutrients is by having as much variety as possible in the diet including plenty of fruit and vegetables (at least five servings per day). A variety of starchy foods as a basis for each meal and smaller servings of fat rich and highly processed foods is recommended. It is better to try and increase the nutrient rich foods in the diet than rely on too many supplements. Although supplements can have a place sometimes, there may still be unknown beneficial factors available in foods that are not provided by nutrients in tablet form.

     
  15. JanSz

    JanSz Well-Known Member

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    People try different approaches and mostly make no progress.
    Mostly the expectation is to compare skin appearances before and after.
    Different assessment may likely be more useful.
    1. forget about making optical/esthetic progress
    2. concentrate more on other health issues and progress made there, first likely would be leaky gut


    .

    Has Paleo helped people who have Vitiligo?
    http://paleohacks.com/questions/81705/has-paleo-helped-people-who-have-vitiligo.html

    .

    Note that on in the link you posted they recommend to eat margarine.
    http://www.vitiligosociety.org.uk/index.php/nutrition.html
    [​IMG]



    .....
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2014
  16. BadassBlues

    BadassBlues Super Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    You highlighted highly processed
    , I read that as advice to limit their intake which has nothing to do with avoiding the list of food you referenced.
     
  17. Sargovar

    Sargovar New Member

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    I've tried lots of dietary approaches to slowing down or reversing vitiligo, and they've all provided limited benefits. My diet is already 95% glutein free, and on the odd occasion when I do eat glutein, for example at subway, I notice no change whatsoever. I can't say the spread of my vitiligo slowed down either after I cleaned up my diet even further, but obviously a balanced, healthy diet can't hurt when it comes to vitiligo. However, I could hazard a careful guess that coconut oil does help slightly. Tyrosine helped, too; it obviously encouraged the melanocytes to reactive by stimulating them directly. I tanned better, repigmented faster and kept the tan longer when I was taking it regularily. I will revisit it in the future, but I'm on hiatus from it at the moment because I felt it was driving my norepinephrine too high.

    I can't go on an extreme paleo diet with super low carbs because I feel like crap whenever I drop my carbs below a certain threshold. My metabolism slows down, my hands and feet get cold, I have zero energy, libido is stone cold dead etc.
     
  18. BadassBlues

    BadassBlues Super Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    The paleo diet is not a cure for anything, it is simply another fad diet craze. If you choose that, great, but would you please keep it to yourself and stop preaching to everyone about it's miraculous ability to cure all the ill's of modern man.

    Consider...

    Gronk (the paleo icon and ancient caveman) had a lifespan of 18-25 years

    The average lifespan of the modern human is 77 years.

    Do the math...:wink:
     
  19. BadassBlues

    BadassBlues Super Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    The internet is full of websites devoted to this condition and all of them are saying this:

    http://www.vitsaf.org/vitiligo-treatmentsproducts/vitiligo-and-diet

    FACT
    It is important to remember there is no simple nutritional answer or ‘vitiligo diet’ to vitiligo that is well supported by scientific data. People with vitiligo may need to follow a special diet to prevent the condition from worsening or to replenish any nutritional deficiencies that may occur. Since it is an autoimmune disease, a healthy diet with balanced nutrition rich in antioxidants, phytochemicals, betacarotene from a variety of sources (raw Veggies and fruits) is a good way to support the immune system. A diet with a good supply of nutrients that promotes healthy skin may aid in the pigmentation process.
    Dr. Grimes has said that blueberries and pears contain natural hydroquinones, which are depigmenting agents, and should thus be limited or avoided. Citrus fruits can cause problems for some people, though not for others. Turmeric, often used as a seasoning, has caused problems for some people, so one might consider limiting or avoiding its use. Some people recommend dairy or red meats or other foods be avoided, but there is no evidence of these impacting vitiligo unless there is some underlying allergy to the products.
     
  20. JanSz

    JanSz Well-Known Member

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    Like I said in previous post,
    it is likely that you will newer make significant progress with optical part of vitiligo,
    so any worthwhile effort (in my opinion) is to figure out life style that gives you the best health.

    Best overall health should be priority #1, any optical progress, that just a gravy.

    ..
     

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